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Posts Tagged ‘access to justice’

App Considered as Way to Improve Justice Access

June 15, 2016 by Kelly No Comments »

AppA downloadable app is being considered as a possible way to improve public access to justice. A recent report from Hackney Community Law Centre proposes a number of possible solutions to make justice more accessible, including the possibility of an app.

The report, Finding Better Problems for Better Solutions, was revealed at Hackney Town Hall. The release of the report formed part of a “digital summit” held at that venue recently. The Law Centre’s suggestion of an app follows a number of other recent suggestions to improve access to justice through the use of digital solutions, including online advice platforms and even fully-online courts.

Mark Brown, development director at Social Spider CIC and co-author of the report, said that such an app could help solve problems with the accessibility of justice. In particular, Brown said that those who have legal problems are often reluctant to seek professional advice in person, and consider a legal professional “the last person” they would like to speak to about the issues they are facing.

According to the report, “push” information would be used to keep the app updated with the latest and most accurate legal advice. It would also have the advantage, the report says, of being available at any time when somebody wishes to seek advice.

Hackney Law Centre has some familiarity with digital legal solutions, as the area has had a fair amount of involvement with digital law initiatives that have taken place in the past. For example, Hackney participated in a digital pilot which provided a direct and easily-accessible route through which members of the public could contact and get advice from barristers. Furthermore, in partnership with Legal Geek, Hackney helped bring about the “Hackathon” – an initiative which sees developers and legal professionals working intensively to develop innovative technology solutions for the legal sector. The second such event is due to take place later in 2016, and will specifically focus on the matter of providing access to justice.

The report also suggested that a better process should be developed for the provision of advice by email. The report also states that the working processes involved in this need to be better coordinated in order to more effectively make use of the time given by volunteers.

The report said: “Currently, while there may be people willing to volunteer their time to assist in delivering advice services in the borough, their ability to contribute their time is limited by a mismatch between the times they are available and the times that advice services providers are available to enable them.”

 

Legal Aid Agency Denies Putting Pressure on Solicitors

June 30, 2015 by Kelly No Comments »

The Legal Aid Agency (LAA) has denied claims that it put pressure on solicitors who were considering direct action in protest against legal aid cuts. Many solicitors around the country were considering taking a form of strike action by temporarily ceasing legal aid work starting tomorrow, but a number have claimed the LAA has put pressure on them to abandon the protest.

Legal Aid has already been on the receiving end of significant and controversial cuts, which many solicitors and legal professionals have criticised for limiting access to legal representation and ultimately to justice. Further cuts are due to come into force this week, prompting solicitors in various parts of the country to warn that they would take direct action. Most recently, East Yorkshire solicitors have agreed to take part in the protest. At a meeting held on Friday for lawyers in the area, the majority of attendees voted to refuse legal aid work when the new cuts come into effect.

The London Criminal Courts Solicitors’ Association (LCCSA) has received reports from a number of solicitors saying that they been called by the LAA which warned them against taking protest action. According to one solicitor, who was scheduled to work with the Legal Aid Agency tomorrow in Blackpool, was warned that refusing to work out of protest would lead the LAA to take action.

Claims of pressuring solicitors to abandon their protest were denied by the LAA. The organisation did, however, acknowledge that lawyers working with the agency frequently find themselves in conversation with contract managers who may remind them of the arrangements that have been made and their responsibilities “if appropriate.”

As well as those in East Yorkshire, legal professionals in areas such as Birmingham, Cardiff and Merseyside have already agreed to take part in direct action. A number of further meetings are planned so that solicitors and barristers in places like the West Midlands, Manchester, Leicester and Leeds can decide whether they intend to join the protest or not.

The LCCSA and the Criminal Law Solicitors’ Association also held a ballot on the matter of Direct Action, which closed at 10.00pm yesterday evening. An indication of the direction this ballot seemed to be going was given on Friday by LCCSA chair Jonathan Black who said that, so far as it had progressed up to that point, the ballot seemed to show that the legal profession was “overwhelmingly in support of action.”